Research Projects

At the CADB Medicine Research Program

We are dedicated to improving the lives of individuals with autism spectrum disorders and related syndromal disorders. We are currently investigating novel treatments for these conditions. Have a look at some of our projects below.

Current Studies
 

Envision Study

Now Recruiting!

The CADB Medicine Research Program is evaluating a potential medicine that targets the endocannabinoid system for autism-related symptoms in  adolescents and adults. In collaboration with Janssen Research & Development, LLC, we are evaluating the effects of this medication on social communication problems, as  well as on repetitive behaviors. The potential medicine, JNJ-42165279, blocks an enzyme called fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which breaks down anandamide, a naturally occurring endocannabinoid. Participation in this study will last approximately 12 weeks with 8 total visits to our clinic. We are looking for participants aged 13-35 years old with a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and a caregiver who would be willing to complete study activities. Participants will be compensated for each study visit and will receive evaluations and feedback. The CADB Medicine Research Program is dedicated to helping people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The program is directed by Dr. Jeremy Veenstra-VanderWeele as a collaboration between Weill Cornell Medicine, the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, and Columbia University Medical Center at the NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Center for Autism and the Developing Brain (CADB).


Compensation will be $100 for caregivers and $81 for participants per visit.


For more information, please email us at cadbmedicine@cumc.columbia.edu

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TD JAKE Study

Now Recruiting!

The CADB Medicine Research program, in collaboration with Janssen Research & Development, LLC, is currently recruiting healthy individuals between the ages of 13-35 for our TD JAKE study. The JAKE system or Janssen Autism Knowledge Engine is a set of research tools used to measure and identity traits associated with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) using an EEG (electroencephalogram), ECG (electrocardiogram) and eye tracker. We are looking for healthy individuals with no diagnosis of ASD to take part in this study to gain information on how the JAKE system works with typically developing individuals. 


The program is directed by Dr. Jeremy Veenstra-VanderWeele as a collaboration between Weill Cornell Medicine, the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, and Columbia University Medical Center at the NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Center for Autism and the Developing Brain (CADB).

Compensation will be provided up to 100$

For more information, contact us at cadbmedicine@cumc.columbia.edu

doing work together
 

The Y202 Study

Recruiting Soon!

In collaboration with Yamo Pharmaceuticals, LLC,  the CADB Medicine Research Program is soon beginning recruitment for a study of a medication to potentially target the core deficits in social communication and interaction in children and adolescents with ASD (autism spectrum disorder) between the ages of 12-21 years old. Prior research indicates that individuals with ASD may have overactive dopaminergic and noradrenergic systems, which are involved in mediation of mood, cognition, reward, irritability, anxiety. The trial medication, L1-79, may help to regulate these systems, which may help with the social communication deficits associated with ASD.


We are looking for participants between the ages of 12 to 21 with a diagnosis of ASD to participate in this 34-week study trial that involves 10 site visitations. Participants will be reimbursed for each visit and will receive evaluations and feedback at no cost to them. This program is directed by Dr. Jeremy Veenstra-VanderWeele as a collaboration between Weill Cornell Medicine, the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, and Columbia University Medical Center at the NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Center for Autism and the Developing Brain (CADB).


Compensation will be provided up to a total of $75.00 per study visit; in addition up to $80.00 travel reimbursement per site visit.


For more information, please email us at cadbmedicine@cumc.columbia.edu

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The L16HTHOUSE Study

Recruiting Soon

The CADB Medicine Research Program is recruiting for a study of a medication to potentially target communication deficits in children ages 5-17 with a deletion on Chromosome 16p11.2. In collaboration with Clinical Research Associates, LLC, the medicine, Arbaclofen, is being examined as a possible treatment option for behavioral symptoms caused by 16p11.2 deletion. Deletion on chromosome 16p11.2 has been linked to neurodevelopmental disabilities such as ASD, Fragile X Syndrome and other intellectual disabilities. Chromosome 16p deletion is hypothesized to effect metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) and cause elevated signaling that may lead to communication deficits. Arbaclofen works to help indirectly regulate mGluR5.  

We are looking for participants between the ages of 5 to 17 with a diagnosis of 16p11.2 (BP4-BP5) to participate in this 27-week trial that involves 4 site visitations. Participants will be reimbursed for each visit and will receive evaluations and feedback at no cost to them. This program is directed by Dr. Jeremy Veenstra-VanderWeele as a collaboration between Weill Cornell Medicine, the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, and Columbia University Medical Center at the NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital Center for Autism and the Developing Brain (CADB). 

For more information, please email us at cadbmedicine@cumc.columbia.edu

Family At Church
 

The Autism Biorepository

For individuals with autism and their biological family members

Our program at the Center for Autism and the Developing Brain is recruiting individuals with autism from 1 to 40 years of age and their biological family members from 1 to 70 years of age to participate in our Autism Biorepository. The purpose of this study is to determine genetic factors that influence the development of autism.

Participants will be given a travel reimbursement of $25 for 2 family members, $30 for 3 family members, and $40 for 4 or more family members.


To participate in the Autism Biorepository, please contact us at:

Email: cadbmedicine@cumc.columbia.edu

Phone: (914) 997-5587

Family at a Beach
 

Past Studies

Conducted at the CADB Medicine Research Program

 

The FX-Learn Study

For Toddlers with Fragile X Syndrome

The CADB Medicine Research Program is conducting a study for children with Fragile-X Syndrome from 32 months to 6 years of age to participate in our study called FX-LEARN. The purpose of this study is to find out if the drug AFQ056, made by the pharmaceutical company Novartis, is safe and has beneficial effects on language learning in children who have Fragile-X syndrome (FXS). The study also aims to find out if a structured language intervention can help children with Fragile-X syndrome communicate better.


The CADB Medicine Research Program is no longer recruiting participants for the FX-Learn Study.

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The aV1ation Study

For Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

We recently completed the Aviation study, sponsored by Hoffman La Roche. The purpose of this study was to test an investigational medicine, called Balovaptan, that blocks a hormone receptor in the brain linked to the control of socialization, stress, anxiety and aggression. We investigated whether this medicine is effective as a treatment to help improve social functioning in children with ASD. To determine this, participants were randomly assigned to take the investigational drug or a placebo pill. Participation lasted up to 39 weeks and will involve regular visits to the Center for Autism and the Developing Brain. This allowed the study team to assess participants general health, social communication skills and social interaction skills.

 

Study of Oxytocin in Autism to Improve Reciprocal Social Behaviors (SOARS-B)

For Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

The CADB Medicine Research Program recruited participants from 3–17 years of age for a clinical trial to evaluate a medication called oxytocin for use in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We wanted to see if this medicine was effective as a supplemental treatment to help improve social functioning in children with ASD. SOARS-B was sponsored by the National Institute of Health (NIH) and enrolled approximately 300 participants at 6 centers across the United States.